Stop Stereotyping Career Moms… (Don’t play with us)!

I recently seen a post about career moms not making good homemakers. This led me to create this post. It is assumed that if you have a career and you are a mother, you are more prone to neglect every other aspect of your life, bullshit. I even loss interest in this creators content after seeing the negative post about career moms. I started to single her out and tell her to speak for herself. All I could think was, “Bitch it’s 2021, Women are raising businesses and babies.”

I am learning that there are many insecure people, and they will push off their inadequacies amongst others to validate why they cannot accomplish what others simply can. Due to their laziness and insecurities, they find it impossible to believe that women like me have the zest to fulfill many roles. Especially, since they are barely maintaining the one role they are supposed to be managing. These women are still waiting for a man to save them and discrediting women who are getting off their ass and getting it themselves. In a perfect world, we could sit at home, barefoot and pregnant with the “ideal husband” taking care of us. However, that it not the reality for many women.

And even if that were the case, would we all be content with that position? Are all women meant to stay home and take care of children without an identity? Should we give up on our dreams and aspirations because of our gender? Or the gender boundaries and roles we are supposed to fit in? If that was simply the truth, why did some woman break that cycle and desire to do more?

Do I agree that it is challenging being a career woman and maintaining a home, yes. Yet, it is far from impossible. It’s called prioritizing and strategizing. Honestly being a homemaker has less to do with your occupation, either you have it or you do not. Either you will do it or you will not. Maintaining a home, creating meals and being a mother takes effort. If there is anything that you desire to do, you will put the effort in to do what needs to be done. I go above and beyond for my children. My career doesn’t take top preference over my family, but it is also apart of why I am an ambitious mother. I support my children to go after whatever it is that they desire to do in life by example.


Although, I respect full time SAHMs and homemakers, I go hard for my mothers who are balancing career life and their responsibilities in the home. I can only speak for myself, but I keep a well maintain home and nutritious meals on my kids plates. I make the bread and I butter it. So before you speak on career moms and what we can and cannot do, analyze your own life.

The fact that people can generalize a group of people due to their ignorance or insecurities doesn’t amaze, but amuses me. I have read so many negative comments about mothers who continue to pursue their professional passions while continuing to maintain their homes and nurturing relationships with their kids.

 For the people who say it cannot be done, or cannot be done successfully. I have proved them wrong every single time. Can I get a purrr… or whatever the young folks say!!!

Tahnee Cole

Hyperemesis Gravidarum

“This ain’t no regular morning sickness. I’m sick all damn day.” I said frustrated.

I couldn’t get out the tub. Work started at 7:30 am and I was still in the tub at 7:10 am. I was crying because I knew I was going to have an awful day. I would be throwing up all day and then given extra work which added more stress on me. I would be taking trips to the bathroom to throw up my insides as discreetly as possible, wash my face and then return to do it again. My days were rough.

My son’s father was staring at me. I could tell he felt helpless, there was nothing he could do. I knew there was nothing he could do, but he was the only person I could vent my frustrations to. I mean hell, it was his baby I was carrying. I looked down at my bump and I immediately started feeling sick. I barely made it out the tub and into the toilet bowl. He stood behind me to hold my hair back. I can say a lot of things about my son’s father, but one thing I can never say is that he deserted me during my pregnancy. He was at every doctor appointment and with me every step of the way. He held my spit cups, he wiped my tears, he bought all my crazy cravings, rubbed my back every night. I suffered from sciatica.

I didn’t know what hyperemesis was. I thought this was just an unlucky curse for pregnant women. I thought there was something wrong with me. I was also sick with Heaven, but after my first trimester I was back to normal. With Jr., my sickness lasted longer. I was extremely sick. I was passing out at work. None of this was a good mix for a corporate America working mom. I attributed most of the ongoing sickness to being a tad bit older (29) and then finding out I was having another gender.

On top of the physical chaos, I was working for a company that did not understand that productivity was going to be low when a woman was throwing up every twenty minutes. I wasn’t the same worker they had knew. I was a new woman, pregnant with her second child and not feeling her best. My life had changed and I felt isolated. I did my absolute best, but it wasn’t enough. As I look back now, I pat myself on the back for what I did. I salute myself for coming back to work after being in Emergency on liquids to help my dehydration from the night before. I salute myself for not cursing people out for asking me to extend myself beyond my pregnant capabilities.

However, as a mom advocate, I will never tell a mentee to accept what I accepted. I will never tell a woman to extend herself beyond her capabilities just to stay employed. I tell women to run at the first sight of ill treatment in the workplace during pregnancy, if you possible. Especially, if HR is also in alignment with the improper treatment. I always say choose yourself first. Never stress or drain yourself out trying to do what you are incapable of doing.

Hyperemesis is a real struggle to deal with and needs to be discuss more. I will never forget about my experience. Despite the circumstances, I was blessed with beautiful babies. I am proud to overcome my obstacles and share my journey with other career moms to encourage them to keep striving.

Tahnee Cole

The Working Mom Chaos…

I recall a time I felt the entire pressure of being a working mom.

I felt judged. I was already late to the parent meeting. I know they heard my heels clicking as fast as they could down the hall. I got myself together, clutched my purse and controlled my breathing. I found a seat in the front. There were no chairs in the back that would save me the embarrassing feeling of being late.

Most of the moms were in sweats, so they may have just thought I was fashionably late. But no, my fancy ensemble was because I was a career mom. What they didn’t know is I had damn near killed myself to get to this meeting. I was on the highway screaming, “Move b—–, get out the way” In my best Ludacris impersonation.

I had made a promise to attend these meetings to show that I was more than concerned and all about my daughter’s progression and education. These meetings though were unrealistic to my schedule. Most of the meetings for working parents were unrealistic. I called my son’s dad to let him know that I was at Heaven’s school and that he could meet me in the parking lot to drop LJ off. He worked third shift and needed to get to work. The meeting was still going on and by now I had warmed up and was giving my input. The parents were actually enjoying what I was suggesting. Partly because they trusted my judgment. I just looked the part of a professional, so it wasn’t hard convincing people that I knew what was best. The meeting was getting good. Heaven was off to the side playing with her classmates.

Jeremey called and said he was outside with little Jay. I had to excuse myself and go get my baby. At the time LJ was about 5 months. When I came back of course people were ranting and raving about how adorable he was. Even mentioning that I didn’t even look like I had a baby that small, let alone 2. I was holding LJ and trying to still participate in the meeting. That was until he realized the breast he adored were concealed with a sweater that went all the way to my neck. Why the hell did I wear a damn turtleneck with this suit? I asked myself. He started tugging and twisting his body so that he could get to the milkies. I looked down at his baby bag to see if there was a bottle, but no. I looked down and his face looked distressed and then came that cry.

If give me the damn milk was a person, Jeremey was him. I gave in to avoid the cry. A little breast never hurt anyone. I was sure they had all seen one before. I discreetly lifted up my shirt, stuck LJ in and under my shirt. I then closed my blazer and went on taking. LJ didn’t like the blazer so he took it off his head and made sure my breast was exposed. Then he had the nerve to look at me. By this time I was like F— it. I was exhausted. I just fed him and finished the meeting. When the meeting was over, I had to gather his car seat, baby bag and my purse. I had to bargain and beg with Heaven to stop playing with her friends so that we could go home. I held her hand, carried LJ in his car seat and walked across the long parking lot. Feeling exhausted from work and parent life this day, I knew it would be some challenging days ahead of us.

Tahnee Cole

The Pandemic and Corporate America Working Parents

It was nothing new to me. Being a working mom can be rough. I’m always making adjustments. When the babysitter couldn’t make it to watch Jr, I had to adjust. When Heaven had early days out of school or snow days, major adjustments. There was usually always some weekly or monthly inconvenience for me. Now the whole world was making an adjustment.

Ironically, just before the Pandemic hit my department had just discussed the new rules for remote working. They were allowing us to work from home more often, little did they know Covid would be forcing us to work remote a lot more than they anticipated. My son was currently in his first year of preschool and Heaven had just started middle school.

Ironically, before this occurrence I was already thinking about summer camp plans. Plus, I knew soon Jr. would be starting kindergarten in the fall. So, I was already worried about how I would arrange my schedule to pick up and drop off both my kids, to and from school. It seems like as a mom, you are constantly thinking ahead. No days off, even in your head.

But when Covid hit, it hit different. Large companies were requiring workers to stay home and if permitted to work from home. The pandemic had forced many corporate companies to be flexible . Or should I say, allow their workers to be flexible. It was now the CEO that had no place to send their children. They were suddenly like the lower level workers. It was a must to let working parents have flexibility.

Covid, had no discrimination and for once, we all felt helpless. It is very unfortunate that it takes major events to realize that working parents need flexibility. This may have been new to many, but working parents go through struggles often with balancing family and career life. Especially, workers who are not paid top dollar or have a spouse that can stay home and tend to the children. Many parents need remote working options and more flexible schedules. This flexibility should continue regardless of Covid dying down. Despite the fact that we have a vaccine created to help us manage to coincide with this nasty virus, our need for balance is still the same. Human Resources should still make sure there are policies in place that will help working parents have schedules that are conducive to family life.

Overworked and stressed parents do not work efficiently and effectively. Yes, working from home is not the easiest while children are at home or doing virtual lessons. However, think about the convenience and flexibility when children are able to go back to school. There will be less PTO used for snow days if parents can stay home, and work when weather conditions prove to be too hazardous to commute. Think of the parents who can use their flexibility to provide their children transportation to and from school. Or get a chance to make sure they are on and off the buses and home safe. Think about the parents who will be able to attend after school programs, teacher conferences, etc. Flexibility is a must and the pandemic showed us that.

Although, there were many parents who worked in industries that could not work from home, there are many parents who had the opportunity. Many of those parents admitted that even though remote working had it’s difficulties, there were many perks. Covid created a lot of chaos, but helped put into perspective how we have been living our daily lives.

Tahnee Cole

The Mommy Motivator!

Too Sexy for work. Are black women criticized more?

“Girl they told me to go home and change my shirt. And I could possibly get written up for having to leave. I don’t get it, the other girls wear shirts just like this, but nobody says anything.”

I was packing my lunch and trying to get Apollo settled as I listened to my friend complain. See Alana is built like a stallion. About 5’8 and curves like a back road. Blessed with long athletic legs, big melons for breast and a gorgeous face to match. She can’t hide in a crowd if she tried. It seemed like no matter what she wore it was an issue. Unfortunately, since she is blessed with this body, she can’t hide it. It doesn’t matter what she wears. Her body is going to stand out.

I listened before I agreed that I thought she was being centered out. She was the only black woman in her department. The other women wore mini skirts and low cut tops, but for some reason they were never called out about their appearance. The chaos about clothing always got started when Alana showed up. I asked Alana to send me a picture of her in her top.

Hmmm, it looked regular to me. No cleavage. No tatts. Just perky double d’s in a blouse. She couldn’t help that. No sweater would hide it.

Alana is not the only black woman I know who has gone through this type of treatment. I myself have been victim of discrimination and nitpicking for my clothing. Especially, when I was younger and always turning heads. It was as if I was penalized if a man stared too long, or if I received compliments. I noticed a bunch of struggles when I worked with the public. Plus, I had the bubbly personality to match.

I do believe that you should be mindful and dress appropriately for work. No super low cut tops or skirts up your butt . But a form fitting dress, paired with a blazer on a black woman is still seen as sexy. It seems at times that no matter what we wear, it does not fit the professional standards.

I know how it was. Being a woman who wanted to add some sassiness to a business suit. I totally understood Alana. Although, I don’t have as many curves as Alana. Being a petite woman I have an ample backside. So my pencil skirts stand out and eyes will notice. Comments will be made and oh the shade…

As I sit around with my female friends with rich melanin, we compare corporate notes and it is amazing the stories. If not discrimination for our hair, it is our curves. Then it is how we talk. It is our swag. It forces so many women to try to conform to an image that is not authentic. It forces women of color to try to dim their light in order to blend in. Knowing damn well, we cannot blend in.

Fortunately, I have not personally experienced this in the current corporation that I am employed. Because honestly if I did, I would be looking elsewhere. I suggest that to any woman of color or woman period who feels that they can no longer be themselves. It is one thing to be conservative and to be mindful of your image. It is another to have to be played down and treated unfairly, because of your unique and God-blessed beauty.

-Tahnee Cole

Saving Money… DIY

I got up at 5:30 am. I took Apollo outside and then I had a craving for a frozen coffee at Dunkin. Oh, what I wouldn’t do for a frozen coffee. The memory of it made my mouth water. It soothed my tired soul and cheered me up. I felt like a prisoner to a new addiction. How did I even get this started? I was very disciplined at one point when it came to any caffeinated drink. I was that mom who did not drink caffeine while pregnant or breastfeeding. Now, I was suddenly depending on this drink to start my morning. And even though the drink is not super expensive, weekly trips add up. As I was working on my budget, I thought it would be funny to check my account and add up all the frozen coffees I had for a month.

65 dollars I said? Naw, this can’t be right. I went back and counted again. Yep, I was spending 65 dollars on coffee a month. And even though it is not much, compared to my salary, it was 65 dollars I could be saving.

Perhaps, I could make my own. Sure, it wouldn’t be like Dunkin, but it would be a great substitute. Plus, I would be saving money. I googled frozen coffee recipes and coffee smoothies. To my surprise I had all the ingredients in the kitchen. Coffee, ice cream, milk (almond milk), ice cubes and a mug. I put a table spoon of coffee, poured in a half cup of milk, two small scoops or ice cream and added a few pieces of ice. The texture looked very similar to what I had ordered at Dunkin.

Yeah right. I bet it will taste like crap, I thought before pouring the mixture in my mug.

I decided to put it in the freezer for a minute. I ran to the store and picked up a bottle of whipped cream. When I got back the mixture was a little frozen. I smiled because it looked so much like the little drink I ordered daily. I put the whipped cream on top and took a swig.

Wow, this was good. It tasted just like the drink I had been obsessing over. Hell, it might even taste better. I looked at the drink and remembered that I had plenty of ingredients left to make this treat daily. That would be 65 dollars I would be saving this month.

The moral of the story is: DIY. When you are saving for a goal, look up ways to do things yourself. You might just be pleased with the results. And if you get a chance, try this drink, its good!

-Tahnee Cole

What I did when I was laid off…

If you have been following me for awhile, then you will know about my story in 2017.

I got laid off in April, 2017.

Yes, two kids, single and I was back hitting the ratchet streets of job search avenue. In the beginning,

I felt scared. Scared to start over and start something new. Then I felt relieved…

Honestly, I had grew tired and stressed at the corporation where I worked. I was at the point in life where I didn’t really fit in. Having a second child had added to my discomfort. Not uncomfortable as a mom, but as a career woman. Being set free had created fear and relief at the same time.

During my time off, I had great pleasure in being able to spend more time with my kids. At the time, my daughter was 9 and my son was almost 2. That year gave me extra time with them and I soaked up every moment.

Then I felt pressured to find something new and solid. I had responsibilities, a home, a car, growing children and we needed medical care. So as you can see, being laid off can bring on a ton of emotions. I am in no way saying it will be easy at all. Especially, depending on your financial situation. I was lucky enough that I had a severance cushion, unemployment and a decent savings account. Some people are not as lucky, but I want to share with you some things you can do to help sustain your well-being. Especially, since many people have experienced lay-offs during the pandemic. Take a look at some of my tips below.

10 things to do when laid off…

  1. Seek a mentor– I met my mentor during my layoff and she gave me a pep talk. Not only did she talk me into returning to Corporate America, but to also create a solid business plan before I exited stage left. She also encouraged me to put a portion of my severance pay in an emergency fund. A mentor is there to encourage you, but also to give you tough love and solid advice. We have to seek counsel outside of our own thoughts. This is the time you need to seek help to make well thought out decisions.
  2. Update Resume- My resume went from basic chick to Rockstar. I made sure that I emphasized everything I had accomplished and contributed the last five years. It was no time to be modest. No more listing basic job functions, my resume set me apart. Straight, to the point and highlighting your strengths is what your updated resume should look like. Make sure to get someone to help or research ways to improve your resume.
  3. Attend job workshops– I attended a job workshop that not only helped with interviewing and resume writing. It also sent me direct job leads. Look for workshops that will help you improve your job skills and connect you to valuable resources.
  4. network– Now is not the time to be shy. LinkedIn, word of mouth, email, reach out to recruiters, etc. Its time to put yourself out there and connect with people who will help you achieve your professional goals. Networking can put you in places that sending just your resume online cannot. Get out there and get social.
  5. create a business or hOBBy– This is the time to go ahead and launch your idea or business. Not only is it a way to bring in money, but you have more time. Many people develop businesses during times that seem inopportune. Also, a new hobby could help activate your mind and hinder your job loss depression.
  6. spend time with family– In 2017, I spent so much time with my children. We spent time going to events. Being laid off is no fun and can be stressful. But as a mom, you want to make the best out or any situation. Don’t waste years and moments being depressed. Try to find joy in capturing moments with the kids.
  7. load up on positive self careAffirmations, vision board events and self care practices will help your cope with job loss. This is the time that you need to take extra care of your mind, body and soul. That your chances of into depression and develop anxiety is lessened.
  8. Take classes– If you can go back to school or take classes, take advantage. I took free PowerPoint classes at the library to sharpen my skills. I even enrolled in some free exercising classes. I know some moms who have finished degrees during times of being laid off. Anything is possible.
  9. Save money and downsize– Even if you received a huge severance pay, not is not the time to overspend. It is time to save, invest and watch your spending. If you can downsize where you live or move in with a family member, do it. There is no sense trying to stress yourself when you have the option to reduce some heavier burdens,
  10. Apply for the career you desire– Now is the time to go after what you truly want. Apply to the company you desired to work for. You were set free to go to the next level. Learn about your desire career, make connections and then go for it.

I used all of these tips, and before I knew it I was working for a better corporation. I hope these tips will help you. Please share any tips that I have missed. Thanks for reading!

Tahnee Cole

The Mommy Motivator

Virtual Learning vs Career Mom

I’m sitting in this Zoom meeting under the covers. For a minute the covers felt like an escape, as if they were sheltering me from something. I could hear my kids voices raising again and Apollo barking at the neighbors outside. I was going to yell and say for the hundredth time I was in a meeting but, f*ck it. The phone is on mute and the camera is shut off. I had nothing to say anyway. I was all out of words. My days were filled with words. Either at a Skype meeting for work, or instructing kids all day. Life had totally changed. I’m not going to say I am angry at the change, I’m just exhausted.

I scrolled down the call to see if  JR’s father had joined the call, just in case I dozed off he could fill me in. Once I saw his name, I felt a sigh of relief. I had trouble focusing the whole day. My mind had been on new opportunities at work, grad school, this entanglement I was involved in and finally this whole adjustment to virtual learning. My mind was so full that I had a minor migraine kicking in. I rested my eyes so that I could ease the anxiety and prevent myself from scrolling on some social media network.

I had to let go a little. I wanted to look at the meeting from a bubble bath, but I had a phobia that my camera would mysteriously turn on. Suddenly boobs and booty all on the camera. That didn’t seem like a great way to meet my kids teachers, especially being a new parent and all.

I poured a glass of wine and closed my eyes again, but I was slightly startled when I heard the Director of the school speak loudly in the phone. She was about to give us information on how we were to adjust to this virtual learning. Prepping parents to step up to the plate and make sure we got our children on board to be motivated. We were to help our children learn like normal. To act as if they are in class, even though they would be at home looking at their Chromebook screens. We had to establish routines, normalcy.

Meanwhile, I was taking the information in,  but thinking look lady I love this talk about preparation, I am all for it. I thought I was the Queen of prepared, but honestly these days I am just trying to make it through the day. I can’t say that I am scared or upset about the virtual leaning, but I have my concerns. This new way of life is very hard on parents of all walks of life, but being a career mom, my whole life has shifted.

On one hand, it is awesome. I get to spend more time with my kids and save money. This transition allows me to be more hands on with their learning experience. However, at the same time, breaks are far few in between. Due to the virus, most fieldtrips (which help with changing the scenery) are out of the question.   The kids have many days that they are unfocused and I have a ton of work. It is hard to focus between the kids and the my workload, so I end up working longer hours. Don’t forget that our employers still expect the same quality of work performance regardless of the situation. Plus, I have a major issue with separating work and life balance as is, but now…

I guess at this point, there is nothing to it but to do it…

I’ll keep you posted.

~Tahnee Cole

 

Helping My Kids Cope With Changes

Some days I obsess about how I am going to work through my work at home days. But lately, I have taken a moment to think about my kids and what they are going through. It was all fun in the beginning, staying home and not going to school. Summer breaks are fun and kids look forward to not having homework assignments. Yet, at some point they miss their teachers, their friends and their routine. As a busy mom, I had to take a second and talk to my children about these changes.

I want to help them cope even if they were not verbally letting me know…

Some days they communicated with their body language. Some days I could see the fear in their eyes that things were changing and not for the better.

Would they be stuck in the house forever?

Especially, my five year old. He will be starting his first year of school and it will not be a normal year. I have been looking forward to sending him off to Kindergarten, but unfortunately life is not the same. We are not even sure if he will be attending school or just doing virtual learning as of now. It seems that I will be opting for the virtual option.

Through this challenging time here are a few of tips I use to help my kids cope with the changes. They might help you and your family!

1.Talk it out– Talk to your children about what’s going on. Explain to them the dangers and the precautious. Even explain to them why you are deciding on virtual learning if you are selecting that option. Let them express how they feel. This is the time to put all concerns, frustrations and suggestions together to help the school year go as smooth as possible.

2. Try to keep it normal as possible- I am still buying my kids new backpacks and school supplies, regardless. Kids gets excited about new school supplies, backpacks and lunch boxes. Even if they stay home and learn virtually I still want to provide normality.

3. Let them know that it is ok to feel disappointed- We sometimes get upset with our kids when they get disappointed. Especially, when it directly relates to something out of our control. Why? Because we feel helpless. We don’t want to disappoint our kids, but we have to allow them to be upset. We have to show them coping methods to help them get through this.  This a battle that they have to deal with and life itself will have many obstacles, and they need to learn how to deal with disappointments. They also have to learn to adapt to change. Allowing them to feel will help them heal.

4. Stay connected- Let your kids Facetime their friends and teachers. Allow them to interact with people on the daily so they won’t feel isolated. It is scary to interact in person  because of the risk, but it is ok to find creative ways to keep your kids interacting with friends and family!

5. Keep it fun- Look up creative projects and plans, share them with your kids to keep them motivated about the school year. My latest project is to create a media center in my home, specifically for my children to work through their virtually learning. I will be showing that to you in the Fall!

I hope all parents are confident in whatever decision they make for educating their kids.  I wish you and your babies safety and many blessings for this school year!

Tahnee Cole

“Shit, we’ve been social distancing.” -Career Moms

It’s nothing new to me. I mean at one point I was getting together with one of my best college buddies for cocktails. Happy hour was the best thing to do, but that was after making arrangements for who would pick up or watch the kids, trying to sneak in quickies and getting stuck at work to finish up one last project. Then sometimes canceling and having to reschedule.

“Can you meet me at The Cheesecake Factory?” Those words were like,  “you’ve just won a millions dollars”!!  I mean let me not exaggerate, but getting together with my adult friends is so necessary. My other professional mom friends especially. They feel me. They understand when I have to cancel at the last minute and they understand me when I cry during our tipsy girls night out. They get my exhaustion. They relate to the love I have for my family and my babies, but they also understand when I am f*cking tired.

I absolutely love being a mom, but I am human. There are times that I just want to be free. No meals on heels. No teaching. No referee moments. Just me sliding down a pole with my girls, drinking mimosas and being plain little me,Tahnee. The balance of still feeling like me is everything. No demand from work or home. That is the value of having a social life.

However, most moms don’t even know what that is. The strong roles of mom and career life makes it hard to see where personal and professional life begins and ends.

I was making it a habit to create a social life for 2020. It was my goal. Then the Coronavirus showed up like, “nah, heffa”!

 This pandemic has made something that was already damn near unachievable, a distant dream. The fear of never being able to be around your friends,  but to also be comfortable around them. I thought about my best friend who is a nurse. Would I go in to hug her like I usually do?  

Unfortunately, many moms are already distant from their social life. They have traded their wild nights for housework. The majority of our days when trying to get out with our friends or significant others depends on: finding reliable babysitters and getting on a schedule that is conducive to both parties. We have side hustles, varying schedules and our kids activities. In other words, we are just busy. 

What are we doing now? Well, just recently I have learned to get creative. I’ve been spending some time with my friends on Zoom. Interacting on social media via LIVES. More phone conversations versus texting. I’m getting closer to my mom tribe via Instagram. We are sharing recipes and DIYS to improve our homes. We are drinking Mimosas over Zoom and learning new skills like, gardening.

And as far as dating, Netflix and chill has gone to a whole different level, but it’s acceptable now.

Tahnee Cole

Stupid Sh*t People Say to Career Moms

A lot of people look at the career mom as a Super- heroine. A lot of people make me laugh with their misconceptions and small mindedness.

`Many women are working outside of the home nowadays and maintaining lucrative careers.

Women are breadwinners and for many that is admirable. Women of today are being praised for duality and viewed as strong, resilient and examples of leadership. Slogans like, The future is her… is an example of the evolution of women.  Many of the most successful women also hold the title, “MOM”!

 However, there is a latter, and we know that no good deed goes unpunished, and no decisions comes without judgement.

The truth is, WE career moms are still ridiculed and talked about by others often. We are always asked how we balance everything, as if there is a definitive answer.  As soon as my child misbehaves in school I am blamed for my career taking top precedence in my life versus being a mother. We are accused of being selfish women, who are more concerned with our professional and monetary success instead of the well-being of our children.

The suggested well-being is for all moms to stay home and nurture their children ideally until they are able to attend school.

While I am for the idea of nurturing and spending time with your kids, I am sure that all moms would not benefit their child or themselves with this arrangement. Truth is, some moms work best when they get time away from their children to take care or fulfill their dreams. Is that selfish? Well that’s a personal opinion…

But how productive and how happy will a mom be if she spends days with her kids while feeling like she is neglecting her dreams financially and personally? Many women who do this often resent their life and sadly their children. With resentment comes triggers that may even cause mental health issues.

I made this post because I have been told some stupid things when found out I am a career mom and I’m honestly sick of the ignorance.

Below are 5 of the most stupid things I have heard and my response to the comments and questions.

1. Don’t you miss your kids?

Five words come to mind when I get asked this question, “you gotta be freaking kidding me!”  That is certainly a milder version of what is actually in my head. Honestly, what kind of question is that? Me being the smart ass I am, I usually say things like, “Absolutely not.”  Why wouldn’t I miss my kids and asking me does not make me feel any better. I am sure I am not the only mom to hear this foolery.

2. If you could have a million dollars, would you stay at home with your kids?

First of all, being at work does not always equate the need for money All career moms are not just money motivated. It may just be a personal desire of the mother to have a career. However, there are many moms who are concerned with financial compensation so obviously that is why they are working. If we had a million dollars we all would probably be making different choices but seriously…

3. Do you feel like someone else is raising your kids?

Of all the questions and comments this ranks high with disrespect. How dare could you compare raising, to me involving necessary helpful partners to accompanying me with my children’s development. First of all, it takes a village to raise a child and whether you like it or not, other sources will be necessary in the proper development of your child. Your child will need other people besides you at some point. Other perspectives and expertise to help them grow and be more multi-dimensional.

4. Do you feel bad when you miss out on events?

My first thought is: What makes you think I am missing out on all the events? Obviously, as a working parent there will be things that I miss. Honestly, I try to make as many events that I can. Me not showing up to support my kids is extremely rare. But seriously, no parent wants to be asked a question like that because the answer is pretty evident.

5. Do you feel like your kids would benefit better from you staying home vs working?

This question used to bother me a lot because growing up with a stay at home mom I could obviously see the benefits in how I was nurtured. It made me feel like I was slighting and depriving my children from a enriched life. However, I am learning to stop comparing my childhood and circumstances to my children. I also believe that whatever is best for my children will present itself and become our reality as long as I am aligned with my purpose.

With that being said, I hope all career moms understand you are not alone. People will support you and others will judge you. Keep going, you got this mama!

Tahnee Cole